Sunday, March 15, 2020

Free Essays on Madison Federalist #10

Federalist Number 10 Throughout our lives we have been raised to believe in democratic government by the people and for the people. We are taught that a person’s view and will are expressed through majority rule. However the truth is the founders of our very constitution were very fearful of majority rule. One man in particular was James Madison, who composed Federalist #10 in order to deal with the possible problematic interest groups label factions. Madison was concerned that this new nation was being torn apart by factions with non legitimate views, which directly threatened the public good. According to Madison a faction was a group of people united and activated by a common desire for certain fervors and interests. The concern was however those factions were a direct result from the different classes that exist within our society, and that class was determined by amount of land owned. This was a problem due to the massive amount of land throughout the nation that poor farmers owned, which cre ated this idea that since they were in the same social level they would have similar interest and ideas. They feared this since now the rich land owners were not at risk, given that they were the minority group. And according to Madison an overbearing majority will end up destroying the rights of others. However Madison knew that liberty could not be destroyed. He knew that the main object of the government was to not destroy the â€Å"diversity in the faculties of men,† but to protect these very abilities or capacities. Madison knew that he would not be able to â€Å"cure† a faction completely, and the idea of controlling one opinion was thought of as non democratic itself. He also knew that equalizing property was not an option since that would undermine the â€Å"right of property†. The fact is taking away liberty or equalizing property was simply out of the question, and would be a complete heresy. So instead of attempting to elimina... Free Essays on Madison Federalist #10 Free Essays on Madison Federalist #10 Federalist Number 10 Throughout our lives we have been raised to believe in democratic government by the people and for the people. We are taught that a person’s view and will are expressed through majority rule. However the truth is the founders of our very constitution were very fearful of majority rule. One man in particular was James Madison, who composed Federalist #10 in order to deal with the possible problematic interest groups label factions. Madison was concerned that this new nation was being torn apart by factions with non legitimate views, which directly threatened the public good. According to Madison a faction was a group of people united and activated by a common desire for certain fervors and interests. The concern was however those factions were a direct result from the different classes that exist within our society, and that class was determined by amount of land owned. This was a problem due to the massive amount of land throughout the nation that poor farmers owned, which cre ated this idea that since they were in the same social level they would have similar interest and ideas. They feared this since now the rich land owners were not at risk, given that they were the minority group. And according to Madison an overbearing majority will end up destroying the rights of others. However Madison knew that liberty could not be destroyed. He knew that the main object of the government was to not destroy the â€Å"diversity in the faculties of men,† but to protect these very abilities or capacities. Madison knew that he would not be able to â€Å"cure† a faction completely, and the idea of controlling one opinion was thought of as non democratic itself. He also knew that equalizing property was not an option since that would undermine the â€Å"right of property†. The fact is taking away liberty or equalizing property was simply out of the question, and would be a complete heresy. So instead of attempting to elimina...

Friday, February 28, 2020

Estimating a Multiple Regression Model for GCC countries- The impact Research Paper

Estimating a Multiple Regression Model for GCC countries- The impact of Exports and FDI (Foreign Direct investment) on GDP in Saudi Arabia (1990- 2013) - Research Paper Example In addition, government expenditure also contributes to the management of the GDP of an economy. Following the topic selected that relates the exports and foreign direct investment aspects of Saudi Arabia, one learns that foreign aspect play a role in shaping the different economies. Considering the Saudi Arabian economy, much of its activities have survived on the aspects of export especially of petroleum products and foreign trade that have seen the economy grow its GDP to reasonable grounds making its economy grow to the advantage of the people (Taylor & Francis Group, 2003). The economy being sustained by exports and foreign income that is raised through the foreign direct investments proves stable in the sense that it can sustain the pressure that the foreign currency exerts on its local currency. Through these, the economy survives various economic challenges as a result of having many economic activities to rely on in streaming in revenue. In trying to understand economic development of any country, these aspects of economic essence need considering that will guide the economy to growth. The details of the paper below discuss the different effects that the export aspects and FDI as two independent variables have on the GDP of an economy. The economy much relies on the two variables as per the subject as a dependent variable. This study devises a regression model that will indicate the relationship between the three variables and any variance aspects, standard errors and other statistical explanations of the results. The data collected indicates the relationship between the three variables that is exports, FDI and GDP of the Saudi Arabian economy. These provide a relationship that describes the different effects that changes to one variable will have to the economy. Understanding the different variables helps one understand the positive or negative nature of their influence to the GDP and the general economy of Saudi

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Biomechnics lab report Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Biomechnics lab report - Essay Example The change in the horizontal velocity during the braking, propulsive and stance phase are calculated. In the results the changes are summarized and the variables are presented in relation to the body weight of the individual rather than in Newtons. The discussion includes the explanation of the general pattern of the Fz- and Fy- time traces an dthe change in magnitude of the Ground Reaction Force (GRF) variables between each running speed. The paper aims to investigate the effect of increasing running speed on ground reaction force (GRF) related variables. According to the Newton’s Law of Gravitation, any two objects with masses attract each other and the magnitude of this attracting force is proportional to the product of the masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance. The gravitational force acted upon an object by the earth is called gravity or weight of the object. Since we always have contact with the ground due to this gravity there is always an interaction between our bodies and the ground. The reaction from the ground is called the Ground Reaction Force (GRF). The GRF is important external force acting upon the human body in motion. This force is used as propulsion to initiate and control the movement. A single male weighing 74kg uninjured participant was subjected to an exercise to determine the ground reaction force. Following habituation, GRF was recorded while he was running across the Kistler Force Plate five times at 3, 4 and 5 m-s-1 10% . Following each trial during the laboratory session, a MS-Excel spreadsheet containing Fz (i.e the vertical component of GRF) and the Fy (i.e. the anterior-posterior component of GRF) versus time data and the braking and propulsive impulse were produced. From this raw data, we will need to obtain the magnitude of the following GRF related variables (shown in fig. 1) for each trial. Calculation of the changes in horizontal velocity during the braking

Friday, January 31, 2020

Synopsis final Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Synopsis final - Essay Example These indicators should be reliable and based on a sound frame work. They should also be Feasible and linked to data sources; Focused on the interests and justice needs of the people, neutral and administered by unbiased stakeholders. They should be nonjudgmental; track data over time and identify trends, establish benchmarks in key areas and contribute to improve implementation of the basic values of the EU, such as the rule of law, justice and fundamental rights. The rule of law plays a very important role in human life. It brings the value of fundamental human rights. The rule of law ensures respect for human dignity, freedom, democracy and equality. It also creates institutional trust among EU Member states. It eliminates vices such as unfair laws, unequal application of the law, corruption and violation of fundamental rights. The rule of law also ensures justice. People, organization’s and business firms enjoy protection when disputes arise. Fair dispute resolution is attained. Human, economic and social development is also attained through the rule of law and measure of property. Waldron’s also argued that citizens can bring out the best in themselves if their rights and interests are respected and protected. He also stated that the rule of law should protect personal property. The society which fails to protect property rights against legislative restrictions is failing to support the rule of law and the measure of property. Waldron’s argument rejects the idea that the rule of law privileges property rights over other forms of law, but instead claims that the rule of law should endorse the use of legislation to achieve valid social objectives. Waldron’s argument considers some of the implications of the law in economic matters and legislative impacts on property through appropriate balance between private property rights and

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Modern Vs. Ancient :: essays research papers

Modern Vs. Ancient "We saw her lying: she had made a noose of her fine linen veil and hanged herself. Haimon lay beside her, his love lost under ground, crying out that his father had stolen her away from him." Throughout history plays have evolved in many ways. For example, the theaters where they hold plays have changed drastically from the original theater. Costumes are another item that has changed, but the content of the play has always been similar, ever since they created the very first play. Most plays have the same motifs, and have relied on tragedy to form the play. The play, The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man in The Moon Marigolds has taken several aspects from Greek drama, specifically from the play Oedipus. The play The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man in The Moon Marigolds and both Antigone and Oedipus have used the same ideas and they both have very similar aspects to them. Although they created the modern play many years after the other two, there are still signs of the old style of writing in them, just like there are in most plays. For example, these three plays use the same motifs in their main themes, in fact they all use pretty much the same themes, and have the same morals. Just like plays passed on from generation to generation, modern plays also have morals in them, and many of those morals are similar. For example, the theme of Antigone and Oedipus was that we should listen to others, and we shouldn't think that we are always right, because there are always people who know more than we do. The theme from The Effects of Gamma Rays on Man in The Moon Marigolds is very similar. They all teach us that we should be honest, and we should listen to others. Both ancient and modern plays rely on tragedy in the plot lines. Tragedy is used for many reasons; to foreshadow upcoming events, make conflict in the play, to show the reader the consequences of different actions, to arouse the emotions of pity and fear, wonder and awe, to explore the questions of the ways of God to Man, and to purify the emotions. For example, in the play Oedipus, there were many tragedies that the author used. In the beginning of the play there was a tragedy because all the people were suffering, and there wasn't enough food. Then after that, there was the problem of who killed the king, and when Oedipus found out it was him, he realized what a fool he was for not

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Differences Between The Impacts Of Hurricane Katrina And Cyclone Nargis

Tropical revolving storms have a marked influence on the areas they consume. Whether it’s at the point of striking (our primary effects) or the secondary factors days/months/years afterwards: they impact on the social, environmental and economic stature of an area. This is evident when comparing two of the most notable tropical revolving storms in the last decade. Hurricane Katrina hit the MEDC coast of Louisiana and the Mississippi in the form of a category 5 storm and the category 4 cyclone Nargis hit the LEDC nation, Burma, particularly the Irrawaddy delta.Despite similar magnitudes the impacts of these two tropical revolving storms varied- so how and why was this? A telling factor of the impacts is the initial effect on the people in the event of the storms. Significantly hurricane Katrina had its most serious effect on the densely populated area of New Orleans. The storm burst the banks of the Mississippi with gusts of wind up to 345km/h and caused widespread flooding par ticularly to the vulnerable low lying regions of the lower 9nth ward, this quickly became the major cause of death with up to 90% of initial deaths as a result of drowning with powerful current s sweeping people away.In total with the combined force of floods and wind up to 1 million people became homeless and 1,833 died. When looking at the same factors in the Irrawaddy delta, Nargis caused almost 10x the amount of death: 138,000 lost their lives with 2. 4million immediately homeless as a result of again strong 220km/h winds and flooding. Immediately then we can see a profound difference on a relatively similar impact region. This is where the infrastructure of an MEDC comes into place.To reduce the initial impacts 50% of the New Orleans population evacuated using their private cars or school buses after being warned by advanced early warning systems in place across the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally many buildings around New Orleans many of the buildings were high-rise brick/concret e constructions therefore escaped the effects of flooding, so not as many homes were completely destroyed. Alternatively in a LEDC (Burma) the area has little infrastructure or no means of evacuation: helicopters, cars, buses were not available.Buildings too did not meet the same building regulations in the USA so strong winds destroyed many homes. So how did these initial social impacts conspire to the coming days/months/years? What were the secondary effects on the people? There is evidence that shows political influences of both the USA and Burma actually worsened the social impact on the people. In Burma the state is controlled by the military or ‘Junta’ and to preserve national pride (amongst other reasons) they did not initially allow for emergency aid. This resulted in a weak slow response leaving over 2. 4 million people with no shelter, water or food, and basic sanitation.Finally 7 days later the Junta allowed the most basic supplies from the UN and other East Asian countries. Added with the poor infrastructure of an LEDC by this time thousands more had died from starvation as well as outbreaks of waterborne diseases such as cholera so in terms of long term social affects those who had survived grew weaker by the day. Moving further in the future it’s believed more than 7% of the current Burmese population are living permanently in plastic shelters as a result of low GDP per capita, characterising LEDCs as a whole, the secondary social impacts were large also.How about the MEDC then? In the event of hurricane Katrina we can see how the USA’s- despite the world’s largest economy (at the time) – government influences slowed the relief effort which in result impacted the social impact. Firstly the federal government’s relief budget could not be accessed immediately due to no emergency congress occurring before the storm hit. The Louisiana state government too were criticised for reacting slowly as well as t he overall amount of relief workers was reduced by up to 60% as a result of the war in Afghanistan.So similarly with Burma the areas with up to 90% destruction faced shelter, water, food and sanitary issues. However with the economic power of USA and improved infrastructure and advanced emergency services including the US coast guard and fire services many people homeless initially took refuge in emergency shelters and even the New Orleans super dome meant over 100,000 found the basic needs quickly- reducing the death and disease characteristic in cyclone Nargis. Although with MEDC’s capacity of wealthy property: crime and looting was a real problem in New Orleans especially after one of the main prisons being evacuated.Something that was less prominent Burma. Socially then, both long and short term, for the basic needs cyclone Nargis had a more profound impact on the people as New Orleans suffered differently as a result of different economic stature in the USA. From the soc ial effects then, we can clearly see that many homes in both the Irrawaddy delta and New Orleans were destroyed to leave so many homeless, yet the impact of both Katrina and Nargis had a wider spread effect on the environment.The US geological survey has estimated 217 square miles of land was transformed by flooding caused by Katrina- and within this many communities, businesses, and public services were destroyed, with 80% of all dwellings damaged in some way. Other significant effects include 20% of all local marshes being permanently damaged, 16 national wildlife refuges damaged and 7 million gallons of oil being leaked into water systems.Drawing in the social effects again we can see how the effect on the initial environment impacts made up to 1 million people homeless however when we start to look at the secondary factors I believe the impacts where minor. Once the people were evacuated and received emergency aid the main environmental impact in the coming weeks/years (evidence d above) was on the wildlife or the economy- despite this being important (as I will elaborate later) it did not have any immediate danger to the people long term.In stark contrast the vast flat environment of the Irrawaddy delta is the life support system that feeds, cleans and pays the people of south Burma. The 3 main environmental factors were impacted on hugely by cyclone Nargis: the shrimp industry was 100% damaged immediately with the destruction of boats and shallow delta waters, over 200,000 livestock were killed which were used for meat or milk or as crop harvesters, and 80-90% of all rice crops were destroyed by sea waters.This then immediately meant people died so the primary environmental impacts were huge. Unlike Katrina in the USA the environmental impact then worsened in the secondary stages. With no boats the shrimp industry has still not returned to full strength to this day and the rice paddies damaged could not be used up to 12 months afterwards with no full harv est till the following year- today many of the paddies have been completely destroyed and there was a large shortage of livestock in the years following Nargis.So then the impact on the environment for the people of Burma was far more detrimental than the environmental impacts of Katrina again enhanced by the LEDC status, but we can see how these effects transpired into the social effects we saw before and indeed economic impacts. Economic impacts always tend to be a secondary issue but both Katrina and Nargis were given an estimated figure for the scale of damage on the economy- and this is certainly telling when looking at the differences in impacts of the two tropical storms. Cyclone nargis was estimated to cost $10 billion –Katrina: $150 billion.This is a clear difference and in many ways, unlike the social and environmental impacts, the LEDC is far better off. AS I mentioned before LEDCs have less infrastructure therefore when cyclone Nargis hit Burma there was far less in terms of economic value to destroy, eventually to replace. Whereas in the USA the sustained infrastructure (distinctive in a MEDC) means there is far more to destroy: so there’s more to replace. Even 8 years after Katrina both on and an individual basis and internationally the USA are still paying for Katrina.The richer people were forced to use savings and insurance to rebuild homes, whereas federal run development programmes, such as the reconstruction of the lower 9nth ward are still taking place putting a huge burden on the federal and state governments. Smaller businesses have gone bust and even public services, like fire stations or forensic labs have shortfalls of millions of dollars to once again become operational. Nationally the economic impact is thought to have also influenced the prolonging of USA’s national recession to, which in turn has affected other trading national like the UK.On the other side in the LEDC of Burma despite similar shortfalls of mo ney to restore the nation to former ‘glory’ the process has more simple. International aid has eventually covered a much higher percentage of the damage costs because of this simplicity and overall cheaper cost- therefore with this aid money pledged by the UN and the Junta it has been a much easier process for the nation and individually. so we can see how long term these economic impacts are actually more ‘manageable’ for Burma after Nargis than those for the USA after Katrina.Concluding then, we can clearly highlight the differences in impacts as a result of hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis: socially, environmentally, and economically- both primarily and secondarily. I have noticed a difference in impacts based on the previous economic state of a country, when looking at these two tropical storms. Socially the impacts of Nargis far superseded that of Katrina both primarily and secondarily and I do not think this would have differed removing the poor p olitical influence both nations had.Whereas environmentally despite the initial impacts seeming worse in New Orleans as a result of Katrina, we can see that in Burma as with many LEDC’s the effect on the environment is far more detrimental in the years/months to come. I think this is because of the pure economic power of an MEDC like USA, it has the money to rebuild the environment in a matter of years- nevertheless this is the downfall of MEDC’s as we saw when looking at the superior economic impacts of Katrina compared to Nargis’s. Thus the severity of impact of these two tropical storms differs, not because of the magnitude, but because of the economic state.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Segregation Of Modern American Schools How It Affects...

Segregation in Modern American Schools: How it affects the Students, Why it occurs, and Strides needed to Integrate Hanna Podwin University of North Georgia Segregation in Modern American Schools: How it affects the Students, Why it occurs, and Strides to Integrate Introduction This essay will be on the Segregation in Modern American Schools, how it affects the students, why it occurs, and the strides need to integrate. I picked this topic because I came from a town that was predominantly white. Therefore my school was predominantly white as well. I have always wondered if coming from this type of school has hindered my ability to interact with people of a different race, culture, or background. I also thought of how my education would have been different if I had been taught at a more diverse school. I would have learned more about other types of people not only from my teachers, but from my peers. I have always been interested in this topic and I think it affects more people than we think. Of course, it affects the students, but it also affects the teacher and the mass public. Culturally segregated schools are hindering learning environments. Black teachers teach at black schools, White teachers teach at white schools, so on and so forth with every race. The public is affected; because the schools in their area are not divers meaning their community is not diverse. Diversity is a catalyst for growth in all people. School and education is a great place to start theShow MoreRelatedAnnotated Bibliography: Segregated Schools794 Words   |  3 PagesStudent first and last names Course title and number Professors name Due date Annotated Bibliography Segregated Schools Nappen, Louis P. Why Segregated Schools for Gay Students May Pass a Separate but Equal Analysis but Fail Other Issues and Concerns. William Mary Journal of Women and the Law, 12(1), 101 135, 2005. 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Later, other EuropeansRead MoreThe Civil Right Movement Of The United States1712 Words   |  7 Pagesupon the subject of segregation, a separation between whites and blacks during mid-20th century America, and children across the country learn the harsh reality of our nation’s history. Modern culture produces media to recreate these events in movies such as The Help, and Driving Miss Daisy. Although much of the media related segregation with the 1950’s and 1960’s, these decades were only a climax of the protests and civil movements during the time period. Not only segregation, racial inequality hasRea d MoreRacial Inequality And The And Out Of The Classroom1519 Words   |  7 Pagesdetermining factor in a student’s ability to access quality education. In The United States of America, race directly affects school factors such as policy, funding, and curriculum. 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This was the foundation for her famous doll tests which is where she asks a series of questions regarding a whiteRead MoreRobert Putnam s Our Kids : The American Dream Crisis1356 Words   |  6 PagesThe American Dream is becoming less attainable, and now resembles a myth that Americans can only hope to achieve. In Robert Putnam’s Our Kids: The American Dream Crisis,the author begins his book by analyzing his own hometown, then branches out to other locations in showing the growing disparity within communities and families. Putman portrays the growing class differences through statistics and narratives on actual people. In this essay I will evaluate Putnam’s book and apply it to the actionsRead MoreAn Article Published By Arthur C. Brooks, A Writer For1697 Words   |  7 PagesAmerica. However, there is often altercation when discussing whether or not meritocracy is present in our modern d ay society. 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My research question is how has the quality and available opportunities for underrepresented minority groups changed in the American educationRead MoreEffects Of Jim Crow1510 Words   |  7 Pagesperception that America was taking a step in the right direction towards racism. The truth was that it was masking segregation in America. In some aspects Jim Crow laws still exist today but instead of color, it is social status that is used. Jim Crow laws has greatly affected America by minimizing education benefits for minorities, social equality, and negatively shifting American culture.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   First, at the closing of the Civil War, Confederates were defeated and they knew that slavery wasRead MoreThe Segregation Of Public Schools1314 Words   |  6 Pagesracial segregation in public schools began over the United States Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Plessy vs. Ferguson’s, â€Å"separate but equal† doctrine, that lasted until the early 1950’s. This precedent legally enabled â€Å"separate† facilities for black students and white students as long as they were â€Å"equal†. During the turn of the 19th century, the term â€Å"Jim Crow† was used to refer to African Americans. This term would later be used as the name of the laws that kept African Americans from public